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Retirement Calculator, How Long will it take you to retire.

Many people have imagined a secured future by the time they have reached their retirement age.

However, only a few have truly worked out the estimated amount of that they need to hit the sack happily. This is because most people are not aware about the importance of using retirement calculators.

With retirement calculators, you can easily foresee the probable amount that you will earn by the time you retire. In this way, you can easily plan the necessary savings that you have to make to achieve your desired amount in the future.
Read More...    Piggy banks are taken for granted at present. They are simply loved by kids. But, from where did they originate? There is quite a bit of history behind the coin bank which has the shape of a pig. Piggy banks have existed for hundreds of years before the introduction of traditional banks. In fact, individuals used to store their cash at their residences in kitchen jars before the existence of banking institutions. Metal was quite costly during the middle ages and was not usually used for domestic wares. Instead, pots and dishes made from inexpensive clay known as pygg were used. Whenever it was possible for the folks to save some money, they would drop the coins into the pygg pots made of clay.   The early models didn't have a way to remove the money once it was inserted, and therefore, it was imperative to break the pig, leaving a pile of broken pottery and lose change. According to some folks, the expression “breaking the bank” was derived from this; however, this notion is not accepted by serious academics. The idiom actually means ruining somebody financially. It is believed that this term had its origin in gambling implying that more money has been won by the player as compared to what the banker could pay. Western Europeans were not the only people making these types of banks. In fact, the first genuine piggy bank was manufactured in Java in the 14th century. However, the majority of these do not exist today since they had to be broken apart for getting the coins.
Now that we know from where the “pig” part was originated, we will take a look at the term “bank”. The term “bank” actually implied “bench” in the olden times. In northern Italy, business was performed by the lenders in open markets where they worked over a table. These sorts of banks had been set up in the main squares by individuals involved in changing and lending cash. The benches were full of currencies from various trading nations. The Italian term for “bench” happens to be “banco” and the English term “bank” was derived from this. The early models didn't have a way to remove the money once it was inserted, and therefore, it was imperative to break the pig, leaving a pile of broken pottery and lose change. According to some folks, the expression “breaking the bank” was derived from this; however, this notion is not accepted by serious academics. The idiom actually means ruining somebody financially. It is believed that this term had its origin in gambling implying that more money has been won by the player as compared to what the banker could pay. Western Europeans were not the only people making these types of banks. In fact, the first genuine piggy bank was manufactured in Java in the 14th century. However, the majority of these do not exist today since they had to be broken apart for getting the coins.
 

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All you need to know about piggy banks
Written for PiggyPilot, By Deban Jan 

   Piggy banks are taken for granted at present. They are simply loved by kids. But, from where did they originate? There is quite a bit of history behind the coin bank which has the shape of a pig. Piggy banks have existed for hundreds of years before the introduction of traditional banks. In fact, individuals used to store their cash at their residences in kitchen jars before the existence of banking institutions. Metal was quite costly during the middle ages and was not usually used for domestic wares. Instead, pots and dishes made from inexpensive clay known as pygg were used. Whenever it was possible for the folks to save some money, they would drop the coins into the pygg pots made of clay. 

Mobirise


   The early models didn't have a way to remove the money once it was inserted, and therefore, it was imperative to break the pig, leaving a pile of broken pottery and lose change. According to some folks, the expression “breaking the bank” was derived from this; however, this notion is not accepted by serious academics. The idiom actually means ruining somebody financially. It is believed that this term had its origin in gambling implying that more money has been won by the player as compared to what the banker could pay. Western Europeans were not the only people making these types of banks. In fact, the first genuine piggy bank was manufactured in Java in the 14th century. However, the majority of these do not exist today since they had to be broken apart for getting the coins. 

Mobirise


   Now that we know from where the “pig” part was originated, we will take a look at the term “bank”. The term “bank” actually implied “bench” in the olden times. In northern Italy, business was performed by the lenders in open markets where they worked over a table. These sorts of banks had been set up in the main squares by individuals involved in changing and lending cash. The benches were full of currencies from various trading nations. The Italian term for “bench” happens to be “banco” and the English term “bank” was derived from this. 

Mobirise

The Piggy bank has evolved along the way and has become recognized as an icon of financial knowledge – a tool teaching kids the advantages of saving and the significance of hoarding cash. The power of this particular symbol has been so much deep-rooted that piggy banks are most often thought of when ever a pig is even mentioned. 

Mobirise

  
   These days, in certain European nations, particularly in the German-speaking nations and the Netherlands it's customary to present piggy banks in the form of gifts (such as a piggy pilot banks) as a way of wishing someone fortune and good luck. “Lucky Pigs” as they refer to them, are exchanged between loved ones as gifts on New Years and special occassions.
   There are also several other piggy bank uses which we have not mentioned in this post. If you like to hear more ideas on this topic or add to this post, feel free to leave your contact information and we'll get back to you.

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10 Ways to Cut Spending

Do you run out of money before you run out of month? Do you wonder where your money goes each month? Do you struggle to find money to invest for retirement, emergencies and other financial goals? Here are 10 tips to cut your spending and stretch your dollar to the max:
1. Consider dropping your home telephone line. Your cell phone is probably all you really need, and most likely it has free long distance. You could save $30 or more per month by dropping your “land line”.
2. Cut back on trips to Starbucks or other premium coffee shops. Often called the “latte factor”, spending several dollars per day on luxuries like premium coffee can really add up. For example, if you spend $4 for a cappuccino five times a week for 50 weeks out of the year (you’re on vacation the other two weeks), you would spend $1,000 in a year. Try treating your trip to Starbucks as a treat instead of a habit. You’ll save money and probably lose weight too.

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Do it Yourself Financial Planning

The fight for financial freedom isn’t fair. No matter what kind of spin you try to put on it, the path to comfortable living seems either impossible or too long to attempt. Many people these days are spending copious amounts of money going to see professional financial planners for advice on how to get their money situation under control. But let’s be honest, while a financial planner can show you how to prioritize your spending and how to go about consolidating your debt, surely there must be a way to plan your finances that doesn’t cost you visits to a professional? Read More...

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